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Most Colorectal Cancer Patients Won’t Need a Colostomy After Surgery

March 18, 2022

Most Colorectal Cancer Patients Won’t Need a Colostomy After Surgery

March is colorectal cancer awareness month, so let’s talk about some things you might not know about this type of cancer.

According to www.cancer.org:

  • Excluding skin cancers, colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer diagnosed in both men and women in the U.S.
  • Over
  • Younger and younger people are being diagnosed.

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Colorectal Cancer FAQs

February 14, 2020

colorectal cancer FAQs

Colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of death in the United States. In fact, research shows that it is the third-leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States, will result in over 53,000 fatalities in 2020, and will appear in almost 150,000 patients over that same time frame.

As with many health issues, knowledge of colorectal cancer means power: the power of early detection, treatment, and in some cases even prevention. You may worry that you or a loved one are at risk for developing colorectal cancer; or you may want to better understand certain aspects of this disease. If so, then the following information will likely prove to be very helpful to you, as it covers several frequently asked questions about this type of cancer.

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Colon and Rectal Cancer in Young Adults

January 25, 2019

colorectal cancer in young adults

study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute made headlines for its startling and mysterious conclusion: The incidence of colorectal cancer in young adults has increased sharply in generations born after 1950. Individuals born in the 1990s (currently age 20 to 29) are twice as likely to develop colon cancer and four times as likely to develop rectal cancer than individuals born in the 1950s were at those ages.

Unfortunately, no one has discovered why is this type of cancer is suddenly on the rise in younger adults. Cancer researchers suspect contributing factors may include changes in diet, more sedentary lifestyles, and obesity. Another theory is that cancers are simply being detected much earlier than in past decades. 

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Are You High Risk for Developing Colon Cancer?

October 30, 2018

Are You High Risk for Developing Colon Cancer?

A Simple Test Could Tell You!

Cancer researchers from Johns Hopkins have concluded that some patients may develop colon cancer due to two specific digestive bacteria that form a film on the colon. According to the study paper, which was published December 2015 in Science magazine, these two types of bacteria invade the protective mucous layer of the colon and create a small ecosystem, including nutrients the bacteria need to survive, causing chronic inflammation and subsequent DNA damage that supports tumor formation. These findings also seem to add to the growing evidence that gut bacteria is more influential on our immune system than we may realize.

The two bacteria the doctors found are known as Bacteroides fragilis and Escherichia coli (or E. coli). The B. fragilis strain, called ETBF, appears to cause inflammation in the colon, while the E. coli strain causes DNA mutations.

Also, the bacteria was linked to patients without a family history of colon cancer. Cancers such as these--where there is no genetic tie--are known as sporadic cancers. Only 5-10% of cancers are considered heredity, meaning the remaining 90-95% are considered sporadic.

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UPDATE: Now Colorectal Screening at Age 45?

June 21, 2018

UPDATE: Now Colorectal Screening at Age 45?

Many of you may have heard that the American Cancer Society (ACS) changed the age of colorectal screening for individuals at an average risk to age 45 at the end of May. But why? While the number of diagnoses for colorectal cancer for adults aged 55 and over has declined over the last 20 years, a disturbing increase of 51% in colorectal diagnoses has been noted for adults under the age of 50 since 1994 (American Cancer Society, 2018). Furthermore, death rates from colorectal cancer in the younger age group are also rising. Based on these statistics, the ACS funded a modeling study that used the age 45 to begin screening rather than at the age of 50. The ACS found that it is more likely that adults will have more favorable outcomes at the lowered age.

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