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How to Read a Prostate Cancer Pathology Report

November 20, 2019

Prostate Cancer Pathology Report

If you’re scheduled for a prostate biopsy, your doctor is likely testing a tumor for cancer. During this outpatient procedure, tissue will be removed from the tumor using a needle. It will then be analyzed by a pathologist, a doctor who reviews the results of the biopsy and provides information about the findings. The results of your biopsy are provided in a pathology report.

Your oncologist or urologist will use the pathology report as a key piece of information in determining if cancer is present and the stage, based on the cell structure in the tumor. It will also play a key role in determining whether treatment is needed at this time.

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Reduce Lung Cancer Risk with the Great American Smokeout

November 19, 2019

Lung Cancer Risk

What is the American Cancer Society's Great American Smokeout? It's an annual event, held the third Thursday of every November, a date on which smokers nationwide are asked to give up smoking. Quitting for just one day helps you take action toward a healthier life, and reduce your lung cancer risk.

Each year, the Great American Smokeout calls attention to the deaths, lung cancer diagnoses and other chronic diseases that smoking causes, and how to prevent them. As a result of this event, there have been actions taken towards reducing the health impacts that smoking can have on smokers and non-smokers including:

  • Many states and local governments have banned smoking in restaurants, public spaces, and workplaces.
  • Increased taxes on cigarettes
  • Limiting of cigarette advertisements and product placements.

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Men and Breast Cancer: What Every Man Needs to Know

November 19, 2019

Men and Breast Cancer

While certain cancers such as brain tumors are viewed as equally affecting men and women alike, other cancers are seen as gender specific. For instance, prostate cancer is identified as a type of cancer that only affects men for the simple reason that women do not have prostates. Breast cancer is widely recognized as being a common type of cancer that affects women. However, what isn't talked about as much is the fact that breast cancer affects men as well. Let's take a closer look at the signs, symptoms, risk factors, screening, and treatment options available for male breast cancer.  

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What is a Gleason Score for Prostate Cancer and What Does It Mean?

November 18, 2019

Gleason Score for Prostate Cancer

The Gleason Score is more than likely one of the first things your doctor will discuss if you have received a prostate cancer diagnosis. That’s because it’s used to explain the stage of prostate cancer you have. Let’s discuss prostate cancer, the purpose of the Gleason Score, how it is calculated, and why it is so important.  

What is Prostate Cancer?

The prostate is a gland found only in males that lies just below the bladder and in front of the rectum. Prostates in younger men are about the size of walnuts but tend to become larger as they age. It serves two main functions in the body. The first is to secrete prostate fluid (one of the components that comprises semen) and the second is to help move the seminal fluid into the urethra during ejaculation with the use of muscles.

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What You Might Not Know About HPV and Cervical Cancer–But Should

November 13, 2019

Nearly all cases of cervical cancer are caused by exposure to the human papillomavirus or HPV. The good news is that cervical cancer is almost always preventable, however, there’s a lot of confusion when it comes to the facts. Understanding more about the connection between HPV and cervical health, in general, can greatly help in the prevention of this kind of cancer. Below is some very important information every woman should know.

HPV: Where Most Cervical Cancers Begin

Cervical cancer is a disease that forms in the tissues of a woman’s cervix--the lower part of the uterus (womb) that connects to the vagina (birth canal). According to the National Cervical Cancer Coalition, 99% of cervical cancers were caused by human papillomavirus (HPV), a common sexually transmitted disease (STD). 

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