We wanted to reassure you that Arizona Oncology remains open to provide medically necessary, life-sustaining care. In addition, our expert care team can now see patients through scheduled virtual appointments on a secure platform from the comfort and safety of your home.

Please note; only one caregiver is allowed to accompany during your appointment, no one under the age of 18, and no visitors in the infusion rooms, radiation and treatment areas. If you have flu-like symptoms, you should contact Arizona Oncology before visiting our clinics for scheduled appointments. This includes fever and symptoms of respiratory illness, such as coughing or difficulty breathing.
We ask that you follow our tips to stay healthy and to help do our part in prevention of spreading of these viruses.

Blog

Head & Neck Cancer Treatment

November 7, 2017

Head & Neck Cancer Treatment

Head and neck cancers are a group of cancers that originate from the base of skull to the clavicles. It comprises diverse diagnoses of cancers that begin in the sinuses, throat, mouth, salivary glands, and larynx. Cancers in this region have a variety of causes including use of alcohol and tobacco. Head and neck cancers often present as a lump or sore that does not go away. It can be painful or painless. In some cases, the mass can cause difficulty swallowing or even breathing and may cause a hoarse voice. There are many non-malignant causes of these symptoms and concerned patients should be evaluated by a physician or dentist.

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Men and Women Need to Get Screened for Oral, Head and Neck Cancers

April 20, 2015

April is Oral, Head & Neck Cancer Awareness Month and Arizona Oncology, a practice in The US Oncology Network, would like to remind both men and women to speak with their healthcare providers about getting screened for the disease.

Oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancers are more than twice as common in men as in women and occur most often in the tongue, tonsils and oropharynx, gums, floor of the mouth, and other parts of the mouth. It is estimated that approximately 39,500 people will get oral cavity or oropharyngeal cancer in the United States this year, and an estimated 7,500 will lose their lives to the disease (American Cancer Society Cancer Facts & Figures, 2015).

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