We wanted to reassure you that Arizona Oncology remains open to provide medically necessary, life-sustaining care. In addition, our expert care team can now see patients through scheduled virtual appointments on a secure platform from the comfort and safety of your home.

Updated visitor policy: For the safety of our patients and staff, effective April 3, 2020, no visitors will be permitted into the clinic. Family members and caretakers may participate in the appointments remotely by phone or video conference if desired.

If you have flu-like symptoms, you should contact Arizona Oncology before visiting our clinics for scheduled appointments. This includes fever and symptoms of respiratory illness, such as coughing or difficulty breathing.

We ask that you follow our tips to stay healthy and to help do our part in prevention of spreading of these viruses.

Blog

What You Might Not Know About HPV and Cervical Cancer–But Should

November 13, 2019

What You Might Not Know About HPV and Cervical Cancer–But Should

Nearly all cases of cervical cancer are caused by exposure to the human papillomavirus or HPV. The good news is that cervical cancer is almost always preventable, however, there’s a lot of confusion when it comes to the facts. Understanding more about the connection between HPV and cervical health, in general, can greatly help in the prevention of this kind of cancer. Below is some very important information every woman should know.

HPV: Where Most Cervical Cancers Begin

Cervical cancer is a disease that forms in the tissues of a woman’s cervix--the lower part of the uterus (womb) that connects to the vagina (birth canal). According to the National Cervical Cancer Coalition, 99% of cervical cancers were caused by human papillomavirus (HPV), a common sexually transmitted disease (STD). 

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HPV and Cervical Cancer: What’s the Connection?

February 21, 2019

HPV and Cervical Cancer: What’s the Connection?

When it comes to cervical cancer, nearly all cases are caused by exposure to the human papillomavirus, or HPV. Thankfully, cervical cancer is almost always preventable. Understanding more about HPV and cervical health, in general, can greatly help in the prevention of this kind of cancer. Here’s some important information every woman should know. 

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5 HPV Myths (and the Truth About Them)

November 30, 2018

5 HPV Myths (and the Truth About Them)

Although the human papillomavirus (HPV) is quite common, there is still a lot of confusion when it comes to the facts. But in order to protect your health – and those you love – it’s important to break through the myths you may have heard about HPV. Here are five common HPV myths and the truth about them.

HPV Myth #1: Only women can get it.

Truth: HPV is a very common virus among both women and men. An estimated 80% of sexually active people will contract it at some point in their lives.

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HPV and Cervical Cancer

April 9, 2018

HPV and Cervical Cancer

HPVs (human papillomaviruses) are a group of common viruses for which some are easily sexually transmitted. Several of these viruses cause genital warts while the high-risk HPV types are responsible for the majority of HPV caused cancers.

The National Cancer Institute reports that HPV infects epithelial cells, which cover the inside and outside surfaces of the body, including the skin, the throat, the genital tract, and the anus. HPV related cancers include cervical cancer, vulva cancer, vaginal cancer, penile cancer, anal cancer as well as cancer in the back of the throat including the base of the tongue and tonsils.

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Reminder for Women to Get Regularly Screened for Cervical Cancer

January 22, 2015

January is Cervical Health Awareness Month, a time set aside to increase awareness of the disease and the importance of screening as a prevention strategy. Arizona Oncology reminds all women to speak with their healthcare providers about being screened for cervical cancer.

In the United States, approximately 12,900 women will be diagnosed with cervical cancer and more than 4,100 women will die from the disease this year, according to the American Cancer Society. Today, however, invasive cervical cancer is highly preventable. According to the National Cancer Institute, the key to preventing death from cervical cancer is regular screening to detect abnormalities in the cells of the cervix early, before they become cancerous.

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