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Are You High Risk for Developing Colon Cancer?

October 30, 2018

Are You High Risk for Developing Colon Cancer?

A Simple Test Could Tell You!

Cancer researchers from Johns Hopkins have concluded that some patients may develop colon cancer due to two specific digestive bacteria that form a film on the colon. According to the study paper, which was published December 2015 in Science magazine, these two types of bacteria invade the protective mucous layer of the colon and create a small ecosystem, including nutrients the bacteria need to survive, causing chronic inflammation and subsequent DNA damage that supports tumor formation. These findings also seem to add to the growing evidence that gut bacteria is more influential on our immune system than we may realize.

The two bacteria the doctors found are known as Bacteroides fragilis and Escherichia coli (or E. coli). The B. fragilis strain, called ETBF, appears to cause inflammation in the colon, while the E. coli strain causes DNA mutations.

Also, the bacteria was linked to patients without a family history of colon cancer. Cancers such as these--where there is no genetic tie--are known as sporadic cancers. Only 5-10% of cancers are considered heredity, meaning the remaining 90-95% are considered sporadic.

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Alcohol and Its Link to Cancer

October 10, 2018

Alcohol and Cancer

A variety of studies have shown that an occasional glass of red wine has been demonstrated to have a positive effect on heart health. Also, beer has been linked to "some benefit against cardiovascular disease”, according to a study published in the peer-reviewed journal Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases. And, at least one study by the European Journal of Cancer Prevention suggests alcohol could reduce the risk of Hodgkin lymphoma.

However, before you pop a cork and say “Cheers” this holiday season, there are some cancer-related risks you should be aware of. A growing number of studies suggest concerning links between the development of certain types of cancers and alcohol consumption.

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What Does SPF Mean?

August 9, 2018

what is spf?

Even though summer is halfway over, August is Summer Sun Safety Month. Which means there is still time to be conscious about practicing sun safety. One major way you can do this is by slathering on some sunscreen.

Choosing a sunscreen can be a daunting task. With so many combinations of numbers and specializations (SPF what?), it’s no wonder a lot of people skip wearing sunscreen altogether. To clear up some of the confusion, let’s talk more about what SPF is as well as its importance when using the right sunscreen for your skin.

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Don’t Forget the Forgotten Cancer: July is Sarcoma Awareness Month

July 9, 2018

Often times, when people hear the word “cancer”, sarcoma isn’t one that quickly comes to mind. Some may not even know what a sarcoma is--so it’s no surprise that it’s considered the “forgotten cancer.” To bring it to the forefront, July has been declared Sarcoma Awareness Month. Now, more than ever, is the perfect time to learn more about this rare disease.

What is Sarcoma?

Sarcomas can be broken into two main types: soft tissue sarcomas and bone sarcomas. There are, however, more than 50 different subtypes that fall under these two categories.

Soft tissue sarcoma is a broad term for cancers that start in soft tissues - such as muscle, tendons, fat, lymph and blood vessels, and nerves. These soft tissue cancers can develop anywhere in the body but are found mostly in the arms, legs, chest, and abdomen.

Sarcomas account for 1% of all adult cancers and 15% of all childhood cancers. The American Cancer Society estimates about 13,000 soft tissue sarcomas will be diagnosed in the United States in 2018.

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Don’t Fry Day: Protecting Your Skin from Skin Cancer

May 21, 2018

Don't Fry Day Skin Cancer Prevention

The National Council on Skin Cancer Prevention has designated the Friday before Memorial Day as “Don’t Fry Day”–a day to encourage awareness of sun safety in hopes of reducing the rates of skin cancer caused by overexposure to ultraviolet (UV) rays. With a little planning, you can enjoy the summer sun and protect your skin–not just on this day, but every day.

The Importance of Sun Safety

Sunshine is enjoyable–but too much exposure to the sun can be dangerous. Overexposure to UV rays can result in more than a painful sunburn. It can also lead to more serious health problems, including melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer.

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