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7 Skin Cancer Prevention Tips to Protect Yourself from the Sun’s Harmful UV Rays

May 19, 2019

skin cancer prevention tips

Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in this United States, but it is also one of the most preventable. With the heat and activity of the summer months still upon us, it is important to be proactive in protecting your skin from the sun and other sources of ultraviolet (UV) radiation. 

UV rays are invisible to the naked eye and are more intense in the summer, at higher altitudes, and in areas closer to the equator. Overexposure to ultraviolet radiation from the sun causes sunburn (erythema), skin cancer, premature aging (skin wrinkling), cataracts (gradual clouding of the lens of the eye), immune system suppression, DNA damage and dilated blood vessels.

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Your Risk for Skin Cancer Remains, Even When It’s Not Summer

April 5, 2019

Your Risk for Skin Cancer Remains, Even When It’s Not Summer

Arizona means living with sunshine year round, even when it’s not super hot outside. That can be dangerous for your skin. Some people believe that the cooler weather in the winter or spring decreases their risk of developing skin cancer. The truth is, regardless of the temperature outside, the sun can still cause skin damage. All sun exposure poses a risk to your skin–even in those months that aren’t super hot. 

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HPV and Cervical Cancer: What’s the Connection?

February 21, 2019

HPV and Cervical Cancer: What’s the Connection?

When it comes to cervical cancer, nearly all cases are caused by exposure to the human papillomavirus, or HPV. Thankfully, cervical cancer is almost always preventable. Understanding more about HPV and cervical health, in general, can greatly help in the prevention of this kind of cancer. Here’s some important information every woman should know. 

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Are You High Risk for Developing Colon Cancer?

October 30, 2018

Are You High Risk for Developing Colon Cancer?

A Simple Test Could Tell You!

Cancer researchers from Johns Hopkins have concluded that some patients may develop colon cancer due to two specific digestive bacteria that form a film on the colon. According to the study paper, which was published December 2015 in Science magazine, these two types of bacteria invade the protective mucous layer of the colon and create a small ecosystem, including nutrients the bacteria need to survive, causing chronic inflammation and subsequent DNA damage that supports tumor formation. These findings also seem to add to the growing evidence that gut bacteria is more influential on our immune system than we may realize.

The two bacteria the doctors found are known as Bacteroides fragilis and Escherichia coli (or E. coli). The B. fragilis strain, called ETBF, appears to cause inflammation in the colon, while the E. coli strain causes DNA mutations.

Also, the bacteria was linked to patients without a family history of colon cancer. Cancers such as these--where there is no genetic tie--are known as sporadic cancers. Only 5-10% of cancers are considered heredity, meaning the remaining 90-95% are considered sporadic.

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Alcohol and Its Link to Cancer

October 10, 2018

Alcohol and Cancer

A variety of studies have shown that an occasional glass of red wine has been demonstrated to have a positive effect on heart health. Also, beer has been linked to "some benefit against cardiovascular disease”, according to a study published in the peer-reviewed journal Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases. And, at least one study by the European Journal of Cancer Prevention suggests alcohol could reduce the risk of Hodgkin lymphoma.

However, before you pop a cork and say “Cheers” this holiday season, there are some cancer-related risks you should be aware of. A growing number of studies suggest concerning links between the development of certain types of cancers and alcohol consumption.

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