Blog

Essential Oils and Cancer Treatment Side Effects

December 28, 2018

Essential Oils and Cancer

11 common essential oils used in aromatherapy for managing cancer symptoms and side effects include:

  • Lavender: used to relieve stress, improve sleep, reduce inflammation, and treat depression
  • Eucalyptus: used to invigorate, reduce fever, and fight migraines and bacterial infections
  • Geranium: used to ease anxiety, reduce depression, and promote sleep
  • Tea tree (Melaleuca): can ease pain, reduce inflammation, and fight bacteria.
  • Lemon: used to get relief from pain, anxiety, nausea, and vomiting
  • Chamomile: used to soothe, promote sleep, and support the immune system
  • Bergamot: used to treat stress, anxiety, depression, and fatigue
  • Peppermint: used to boost energy, enhance mental alertness, fight fever, and relieve nausea and other digestion issues
  • Ginger: used to stimulate appetite and help ease nausea, vomiting, and bowel problems
  • Cedarwood: can promote relaxation and reduce stress
  • Frankincense: used to reduce inflammation and pain, boost immunity, soothe skin irritations, fight infections, and improve anxiety

Read More

6 Signs and Symptoms of Ovarian Cancer That Every Woman Should Know

December 12, 2018

Ovarian Cancer Signs and Symptoms

6 ovarian cancer signs and symptoms every woman should know: 

  1. Changes in appetite
  2. Bloating or increase in abdominal girth
  3. Frequent urination
  4. Changes in menstruation
  5. Discomfort in the pelvis
  6. Low energy 

September is Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, so it's a good time to learn more about early detection and save lives. About 22,000 women are diagnosed with ovarian cancer each year in the US. While about half of all cases happen in women who are age 63 and older, all women face some risk of developing the disease. Certain risk factors, including being overweight and a history of ovarian cancer in the family, may increase your chances of being diagnosed. Ovarian cancer research clinical trials are underway, but it's still good for patients to be educated about detecting ovarian cancer early.

Only 19% of women are diagnosed in the early stages of this disease. That’s because many symptoms of ovarian cancer could also be signs of less serious medical problems. However, if you notice any of these symptoms for more than 12 days per month and they are new to you, it is time to visit your gynecologist for a checkup:

Read More

5 HPV Myths (and the Truth About Them)

November 30, 2018

Although the human papillomavirus (HPV) is quite common, there is still a lot of confusion when it comes to the facts. But in order to protect your health – and those you love – it’s important to break through the myths you may have heard about HPV. Here are five common HPV myths and the truth about them.

HPV Myth #1: Only women can get it.

Truth: HPV is a very common virus among both women and men. An estimated 80% of sexually active people will contract it at some point in their lives.

Read More

Genetic vs Genomic Testing: What’s the Difference?

November 26, 2018

Although the terms “genetic” and “genomic” are often used interchangeably, they are actually very different. Learning more about the differences between them can help clear up some of the confusion we often see related to hereditary genes linked to developing cancer.

Genetic Testing  

Genetics usually refers to the study of specific, individual genes and whether they are passed from one generation to the next. Cancer researchers have studied hereditary gene mutations (changes) that can play a role in the development of cancer.  

Genetic tests are medical tests that look for certain inherited gene mutations. This allows the genetic counselor to understand if the person being assessed is at a higher risk for developing certain kinds of cancers - such as breast cancer, ovarian cancer, colon cancer, prostate cancer, or others.

Read More

Are You High Risk for Developing Colon Cancer?

October 30, 2018

A Simple Test Could Tell You!

Cancer researchers from Johns Hopkins have concluded that some patients may develop colon cancer due to two specific digestive bacteria that form a film on the colon. According to the study paper, which was published December 2015 in Science magazine, these two types of bacteria invade the protective mucous layer of the colon and create a small ecosystem, including nutrients the bacteria need to survive, causing chronic inflammation and subsequent DNA damage that supports tumor formation. These findings also seem to add to the growing evidence that gut bacteria is more influential on our immune system than we may realize.

The two bacteria the doctors found are known as Bacteroides fragilis and Escherichia coli (or E. coli). The B. fragilis strain, called ETBF, appears to cause inflammation in the colon, while the E. coli strain causes DNA mutations.

Also, the bacteria was linked to patients without a family history of colon cancer. Cancers such as these--where there is no genetic tie--are known as sporadic cancers. Only 5-10% of cancers are considered heredity, meaning the remaining 90-95% are considered sporadic.

Read More